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Woodworking joints have been part of cabinetmaking for hundreds of years. The finest furniture uses the right joint for the right application. Here is a list of some joints and their typical applications:

Butt joint – the most simple, but weakest joint.

Mitre joint – a simple 45 degree cut hides the joint and is relatively strong. A pin or scree can be added on the two sides.

Lap joint – similar to the Butt joint with a 50 percent of the one side cut away to provide a clean surface on the one side. Ideal for drawers.

Dowel joint – similar to the Butt joint with wooden dowels to provide support.

Comb Finger joint – interlinking fingers are cut to increase the surface area for glue and increase the strength.

Dovetail joint – interlinking Dovetail fingers are cut to increase the surface area for glue and increase the strength by the joint not being able to pull out.

Skarf joint – A 45 degree angle cut to increase the surface area of the joint for the glue adhesion.

Finger  joint – fine angle cuts are made on both sides of the wood by a special cutter. Very strong because of the large surface area

M  joint – Medium angle cuts are made on both sides of the wood by a special cutter. Quite strong because of the large surface area

Housing  joint – a simple slot is cut to allow for the wood to fit at 90 degrees. Can be suported with pins, screws or dowels.