Basketry

Basket weaving (also basketry or basket making) is the process of weaving or sewing pliable materials into two- or threedimensional artefacts, such as mats or containers. Craftspeople and artists specialised in making baskets are usually referred to as basket makers and basket weavers.

Basketry is made from a variety of fibrous or pliable materials—anything that will bend and form a shape. Examples include pine straw, stems, animal hair, hidegrasses, thread, and fine wooden splints.

Indigenous peoples are particularly renowned for their basket-weaving techniques. These baskets may then be traded for goods but may also be used for religiousceremonies.

Classified into four types, according to Catherine Erdly:[1]

“Coiled” basketry
using grasses and rushes
“Plaiting” basketry
using materials that are wide and braidlike: palmsyucca or New Zealand flax
“Twining” basketry
using materials from roots and tree bark. Twining actually refers to a weaving technique where two or more flexible weaving elements (“weavers”) cross each other as they weave through the stiffer radial spokes.
“Wicker” and “Splint” basketry
using reedcanewillowoak, and ash

Home

RELATED MAKERS

RELATED SUPPLIERS

Comments

Add a comment

mood_bad
  • No comments yet.
  • chat
    Add a comment
    keyboard_arrow_up